55 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    5 things U don’t know about me……LA

    Oops…I hit the wrong key…here goes again…

    I saw Hank aaron hit # 715 in ’74.
    I witnessed a bank robbery.
    I played the organ for church during high school.
    I have college credit from 3 SEC schools.
    I taught Tim Bowens..10 million dollar lineman with the Miami Dolphins.

  2. Timothy Leary? John Delorean? Tito freaking Jackson? LOL… You’ve had quite the diverse cast roll through your life. My favorite is the “break into your car” contest. I most certainly hope you gave the winner some extra credit.

    • Yep, I’ve met an interesting cast of characters…some might say that I’m a character myself (not that I’d disagree). Definitely, extra credit was involved. Once they knew how easy it was to break into my car, I had to “buy” an insurance policy. heh.

          • Ordinarily, I’d say “eeeewwwwww” if Schwarzenegger touched me. lol… but he’s doing something good here.

            Wow… what an absolutely horrible story. But what a terrific outcome. You and your family have so much strength. I think most people wouldn’t take the stand you all did. Most would prefer to do nothing, to play the victim. Good on you all for taking such proactive steps to help others. That’s terrific. I’m very much in awe. Good for you guys.

            Neither of the stories I read made any mention of why these idiots attacked your son in the first place?

          • I’m humbled by your comments, though I do realize that it wasn’t ordinary, the stance we took. Honestly, though, I’d crawl over broken glass to protect those whom I love. One angry mother, um, bear: that was me!

            Did you see “MY ROSA RESOLUTION”? That details the assault and aftermath and explains that it really was an unprovoked, senseless assault by a large group of athletes on someone much smaller than they were:
            http://newport2newport.livejournal.com/6410.html

          • That is an incredible story. I so very admire you and your family for having the courage and the conviction to take the stand you did and see it all the way through. That’s very awe-inspiring and for what it’s worth, I absolutely applaud you all.

            The attitude displayed by the coach and by the NCAA officials as well as that of the institution itself is exactly what’s wrong with college athletics these days. The athletes are above the law simply because the schools are making money on their backs. The sense of entitlement of so many pro and collegiate athletes absolutely disgusts me beyond belief. And I say that as somebody who’s played and passionatly loves sports. It sickens me.

            What you and your family accomplished is amazing. I’m glad that your son has healed and that you’ve all been able to move on. I can guarantee that Rosa would be very, very proud of your resolution.

          • *is humbled by your words*

            We all get to be heroes, don’t we, if we choose? Each of us goes through painful experiences in our lives. But if we keep our eyes, ears and hearts open, we find the healing path back home, a (triumphant) return to personal power.

          • Your words about Rosa brought tears to my eyes. Thank you; I’m humbled and grateful for them. It’s important for me that you know, however, that we weren’t doing this for personal attention or admiration. I was astounded, in fact, when I was accused by naysayers of doing this for personal glory. The journey was well-worth it, though, as the law fulfills my Rosa Resolution, setting right at least some of the wrongs you mention in your comments.

          • Oh, it never even occured to me that you were doing it for some sort of personal attention. Not at all. I’m astonished that anybody would think that. It’s people like you, that take the initiative and work to make things better for those that follow that are worthy of the admiration and respect of others. You took a stand and made something positive happen. How many people can say that?

          • Your words about Rosa brought tears to my eyes. Thank you; I’m humbled and grateful for them. It’s important for me that you know, however, that we weren’t doing this for personal attention or admiration. I was astounded, in fact, when I was accused by naysayers of doing this for personal glory. The journey was well-worth it, though, as the law fulfills my Rosa Resolution, setting right at least some of the wrongs you mention in your comments.

          • That is an incredible story. I so very admire you and your family for having the courage and the conviction to take the stand you did and see it all the way through. That’s very awe-inspiring and for what it’s worth, I absolutely applaud you all.

            The attitude displayed by the coach and by the NCAA officials as well as that of the institution itself is exactly what’s wrong with college athletics these days. The athletes are above the law simply because the schools are making money on their backs. The sense of entitlement of so many pro and collegiate athletes absolutely disgusts me beyond belief. And I say that as somebody who’s played and passionatly loves sports. It sickens me.

            What you and your family accomplished is amazing. I’m glad that your son has healed and that you’ve all been able to move on. I can guarantee that Rosa would be very, very proud of your resolution.

          • I’m humbled by your comments, though I do realize that it wasn’t ordinary, the stance we took. Honestly, though, I’d crawl over broken glass to protect those whom I love. One angry mother, um, bear: that was me!

            Did you see “MY ROSA RESOLUTION”? That details the assault and aftermath and explains that it really was an unprovoked, senseless assault by a large group of athletes on someone much smaller than they were:
            http://newport2newport.livejournal.com/6410.html

    • Yep, I’ve met an interesting cast of characters…some might say that I’m a character myself (not that I’d disagree). Definitely, extra credit was involved. Once they knew how easy it was to break into my car, I had to “buy” an insurance policy. heh.

  3. Timothy Leary? John Delorean? Tito freaking Jackson? LOL… You’ve had quite the diverse cast roll through your life. My favorite is the “break into your car” contest. I most certainly hope you gave the winner some extra credit.

  4. Ha! You got me! I’ll have to think about that a bit more: I already have 3 things. I’ll post my list when I’ve finshed my Snopopy story – two days more, I think!

  5. OK, I’m going to try and match your Tomothy Leary story: I knew the guy who hired and fired him from Harvard! HA!
    He is Dr David McClelland, who was the Director of the Centre for Personality research at Harvard back then; part of the story is here http://www.freeinfosociety.com/site.php?postnum=88
    David (he died a few years back) and his second wife were good friends of mine and I stayed at their home in Cambridge for six months in 1981.

    • Oh, wow; that’s cool!!! You stayed with them? Now that’s an interesting story in itself (do tell)!

      This is one of those Six Degrees of Separation things — another way our lives are interconnected. I like that! 🙂

      • OK, here goes. You know, of course, that I go to India quite often. And visit/live in an ashram there. Well, I knew David and his first wife from there. Marion, his second wife, was also a part of the group that used to meet in India. When I first met David and his first wife she already had cancer and was dying. The she died.
        His scond wife, Marion, was among the friends who helped him through his grief. It developed into something more. They married about a year after the first wife died. He was in his 60’s, she (second wife!) in her 30’s and the stories they told about having to sneak out like teeanegrs was quite funny.
        They were both wonderful women. With his first wife he had five children, with his second two daughters adopted from India.
        I stayed at their home in Cambridge for six months in 1981.

      • OK, here goes. You know, of course, that I go to India quite often. And visit/live in an ashram there. Well, I knew David and his first wife from there. Marion, his second wife, was also a part of the group that used to meet in India. When I first met David and his first wife she already had cancer and was dying. The she died.
        His scond wife, Marion, was among the friends who helped him through his grief. It developed into something more. They married about a year after the first wife died. He was in his 60’s, she (second wife!) in her 30’s and the stories they told about having to sneak out like teeanegrs was quite funny.
        They were both wonderful women. With his first wife he had five children, with his second two daughters adopted from India.
        I stayed at their home in Cambridge for six months in 1981.

  6. You only become more fascinating dear girl! How is that posible. But did you get to DRIVE a Delorean??? ( No, I didn’t, just wonderinf if Christina took you for a spin )

  7. You only become more fascinating dear girl! How is that posible. But did you get to DRIVE a Delorean??? ( No, I didn’t, just wonderinf if Christina took you for a spin )

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